Why Do We Celebrate Easter?

Question: “What is the reason why do we celebrate Easter?” Answer: Easter has been celebrated in many countries across the globe for centuries. In some of these countries, Easter is a religious festival to bring God’s gift of new life into the world; whereas, for other nations, Easter is simply a time to celebrate the rebirth of humankind. The one thing that unites these two celebrations is that they all share a common theme – God and salvation. We will now explore this theme and explain why do we celebrate Easter.

 

A. The Christian Viewpoint. Christianity sees Easter as a moment of redemption from sin. Through Easter, God sends his son, Jesus, to Earth to die and rise again in order to reconcile the world to himself. Through Easter, God saves those that he is willing to save and those that he no longer wants as part of his creation.

 

B. The Pagan Viewpoint. Many non-Christians view Easter as a time for egg hunting and eating ham as part of the celebration. This view is widely rejected by Christians who view Easter as the climax of the Passion of Christ and the Resurrection of the body of Christ.

 

C. The Universal Viewpoint. The fact that Easter is a Christian holiday and is observed around the world by Christians makes it an appropriate time to celebrate Easter. The resurrection of Jesus Christ is viewed by many Christians as the focal point of Easter. Christians believe that Christ brought the physical resurrection and death, while at the same time leaving a spiritual body and soul to continue to guide and work in the future with His followers.

 

D. The Mystical Viewpoint. Christians view Easter as a time when they return to their most important message of the season which is the message of salvation which is taught in the Gospel of Luke. Christians believe that they have been delivered from sin, but they continue to live in the grace of God. The symbolism of egg yolks symbolize the death and burial of Jesus Christ and the fact that Easter is the last Sunday of the entire carnal year serves to remind Christians that they still need to keep in step with the times so that they can be aware of the forgiveness offered by Jesus Christ.

 

E. The Motive For Everyone. Most Christians celebrate Easter as a special family event, where they go out of their way to make this day memorable. In addition to eating and sharing fun activities, many Christians enjoy observing what are known as Egg Rollers which is held every Friday evening during the week before Easter. During the Egg Roll, children line up to pass a basket of eggs to each other and a volunteer photographer takes photographs of them all while they are being drawn to an egg. This photograph is often displayed in the church or home where the Egg Roll is holding to remind the rest of the family of what everyone has been through over the past year.

 

F. The Resurrection. Easter Sunday is also known as the Day of the Resurrection, which marks the start of the Christian era. On this day, following the death of Jesus Christ, His body was raised from the dead after three days and was found miraculously risen from the grave. This miracle has become a central part of Christian faith and Christian theology. Catholics commemorate Easter as “The Day of the Conception of Mary” which is why most parishes use the term “Easter” on their gravestones. While the Catholic Church makes much of the resurrection as a miraculous event, many non-religious people view Easter as a time for joy and celebration, which is why the Christian community celebrates Easter as a festival.

 

G. The Eucharist. The Eucharist is the gift of God’s grace which was made complete at Christ’s last supper. Christians believe that the true food of the soul is the food which God provides every year in the Spring of Easter. The Eucharist is also known as the sacrifice of Christ, as He gave up his own life for the salvation of His loved ones. During the season of Easter, children are encouraged to give thanks for the gift of childbirth by participating in the Eucharistic celebration known as the Easter Sunday brunch.