News That Matters

Tag: Reconciliation

‘I downplayed it all’: Métis man shares journey to self-love after residential school
Global News

‘I downplayed it all’: Métis man shares journey to self-love after residential school

Warning: This story deals with disturbing subject matter that may upset and trigger some readers. Discretion is advised. Gary Têtu’s life story is told in dozens of tattoos all over his body.Some are from his past life – a time of “self-hatred” – but others are a monument to love, healing and the sacred teachings of his people.On one arm, a Medicine Wheel, a Métis infinity symbol and a peace sign are visible. On the other, motorcycle handlebars overlook a road leading into the sunset – his “happy place” – while an orange ribbon honours Le Estcwicwéy̓, the missing children who never made it home from residential schools.That same arm also has a graveyard with tombstones marking everything in his life he wants to put to rest, including “rage,” “ego,” “worry,” and “IRS,”  which stan...
‘Dance with the universe:’ Indigenous languages, reconciliation and the papal tour
Global News

‘Dance with the universe:’ Indigenous languages, reconciliation and the papal tour

Warning: This story deals with disturbing subject matter that may upset and trigger some readers. Discretion is advised. According to Tom McCallum (White Standing Buffalo), when Cree-speaking peoples first saw the “black robes” kneeling down and immersed in prayer, they didn’t know what the clergymen were doing.Pointing up to the heavens, the church leaders explained, “We’re talking to Him,” said McCallum.The moment gave birth to the Cree expression for prayer, ayamihowin, which is composed of the root words ayamiha, “talking to him or her,” kakiki, “forever or perpetual,” and simo, which means “movement or dance.” Win is added to end of the word to indicate a process underway, he said.“We have a perpetual dance with the universe,” McCallum said, translating ayamihowin in an inter...
Pope Francis receiving a headdress elicits heated emotions amongst First Nations communities
Global News

Pope Francis receiving a headdress elicits heated emotions amongst First Nations communities

Pope Francis being gifted a headdress by Chief Wilton Littlechild was a powerful and symbolic moment — but the symbolism is not sitting well with everyone. The Pope was given the headdress on Treaty 6 territory, in the central Alberta First Nations community of Maskwacis, after he apologized for the Catholic Church’s role in the residential school system on Monday.The apology came with cheering from the crowd, and some people were weeping. Soon after, Chief Littlechild went on stage and placed a headdress on Pope Francis’ head.The former member of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission attended residential schools for 14 years as a child in Alberta.It was a stunning image: Francis briefly wearing the full Indigenous headdress, its rows of soft white feathers fastened in place by ...