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Tag: exercise and fitness

Got the ‘Winter Blues’? Exercise Can Help
Fitness

Got the ‘Winter Blues’? Exercise Can Help

By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter(HealthDay)SATURDAY, Nov. 12, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- A good workout can boost mood, making it an ideal routine as the days get shorter and darker.If you're one of the millions affected by seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and you feel tired, unmotivated, down on life and crave carbs and sweets, staying active can help. An expert from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston offers some tips for maintaining an exercise routine.“With seasonal affective disorder, it is desirable to continue to exercise or maybe even increase your exercise,” said Dr. James McDeavitt, a professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation. “Relatively sustained aerobic exercise effects mood positively, but you don’t just have to run or do aerobics — you can do things like yoga, ta...
Exercise Improves Brain Health in Overweight, Obese Youth – Consumer Health News
Fitness

Exercise Improves Brain Health in Overweight, Obese Youth – Consumer Health News

FRIDAY, Sept. 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise positively affects intelligence and cognitive flexibility among school-aged children with overweight or obesity, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in JAMA Network Open.Francisco B. Ortega, Ph.D., from University of Granada in Spain, and colleagues assessed whether an exercise intervention of aerobic plus resistance training improved cognitive and brain health outcomes for children with overweight or obesity. The analysis included 109 children (aged 8 to 11 years) randomly assigned to a 20-week trial of intervention or usual routines.The researchers found that the exercise intervention improved crystallized intelligence as well as total intelligence versus the control group. There was also a positive effect observed for exerc...
Exercise Rates Still Haven’t Recovered From Pandemic, Global Study Shows – Consumer Health News
Fitness

Exercise Rates Still Haven’t Recovered From Pandemic, Global Study Shows – Consumer Health News

THURSDAY, Sept. 1, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The COVID-19 pandemic stopped people in their tracks, reducing their physical activity. And daily "step counts" still haven't reached previous numbers, according to a new study. Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco examined worldwide trends in physical activity by measuring step counts in the two years following the start of the pandemic. Step counts were distinctly lower early in the pandemic compared to pre-pandemic levels and remained lower for the first two years of the global crisis, the study team found."As the global pandemic persists, understanding its long-term ramifications on physical activity is crucial," said cardiologist and study co-author Dr. Geoffrey Tison. Exercise guidelines for Americans call for at ...
Exercise more than recommended amounts for longest life, study says
Fitness

Exercise more than recommended amounts for longest life, study says

Subscribe to CNN’s Fitness, But Better newsletter. Sign up for our newsletter series to ease into a healthy routine, backed by experts. CNN  —  A longer life may mean scheduling in even more than the recommended amount of weekly exercise, according to a new study. Adults should get 150 to 300 minutes of moderate physical activity or 75 to 150 minutes of vigorous physical activity a week, according to the World Health Organization. But people who surpass those levels live longer than those who don’t. Researchers analyzed more than 116,000 adults in a study published Monday in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. Participants self-reported their leisure time activity in qu...
More Evidence Fitness Trackers Can Boost Your Health
News

More Evidence Fitness Trackers Can Boost Your Health

By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter(HealthDay)TUESDAY, July 26, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Your fitness tracker, pedometer or smartwatch may motivate you to exercise more and lose weight, Australian researchers say.In a large research review, the investigators found that tracking your activity might inspire you to walk up to 40 minutes more a day (about 1,800 more steps). And those extra steps could translate to the loss of more than two pounds over five months."In the mainstream media, there can be a lot of skepticism about wearable activity trackers, such as whether they make any difference and whether they even have negative impacts, such as making people feel guilty," said senior researcher Carol Maher. She is a professor of population and digital health at the University of South A...