News That Matters

Tag: Employment

More than half of American workers engage in “quiet quitting,” Gallup finds
Business

More than half of American workers engage in “quiet quitting,” Gallup finds

An employment trend known as "quiet quitting" — clocking in and doing the bare minimum at work — isn't a niche phenomenon, according to Gallup. with the polling organization finding that more than half of American workers routinely mail it in on the job.Quiet quitting doesn't mean that a worker has left her job, but instead describes a number of general behaviors including setting boundaries and declining to work in the evenings or weekends. About half of workers are "not engaged," which means they are doing the minimum required and are psychologically detached from their jobs, according to the survey. While that share isn't all that different from past years, Gallup found there's been a recent jump in "actively disengaged" workers, or people who are loudly dissatisfied with wor...
“Quiet quitting”: A revolution in how we work or the end of working hard?
Business

“Quiet quitting”: A revolution in how we work or the end of working hard?

There's a new term for clocking in and doing the bare minimum at work: "quiet quitting." The phrase is percolating through career sites like LinkedIn, where some job coaches and executives are cautioning against the practice, and on TikTok, where workers are going viral by explaining why they're jumping on the quiet-quitting bandwagon. What everyone can agree on is that the term doesn't mean that an employee has quit, but rather that they are setting boundaries at work and refusing to go above and beyond in completing their duties. The emergence of the quiet-quitting phenomenon isn't a fluke, experts say. It is partly a byproduct of the COVID-19 pandemic, when millions of workers lost their jobs as the disease shuttered the economy. Although most have found new jobs or been rehi...
Jobless claims at 8-month high as layoffs edge higher
Business

Jobless claims at 8-month high as layoffs edge higher

The number of Americans collecting jobless benefits last week is at its highest level since November, a sign the labor market is cooling as the Federal Reserve tries to lower inflation by slowing economic growth.Applications for jobless aid for the week ending July 30 rose by 6,000 to 260,000, matching an eight-month high set two weeks ago, the Labor Department reported Thursday. First-time applications generally reflect layoffs. The four-week average for claims, which evens out the weekly ups and downs, also rose from the previous week, to nearly 255,000. Jobless claims have been steadily rising since hitting a 50-year low in early April."The direction of filings has changed. from sustained declines to an uptrend, signaling a shift in the labor market. Overall, further interes...
Key inflation gauge jumps 6.8% in June as prices continue to surge
Politics

Key inflation gauge jumps 6.8% in June as prices continue to surge

An inflation gauge that is closely tracked by the Federal Reserve jumped 6.8% in June from a year ago, the biggest annual increase in four decades.Friday's government figures underscore the persistence of the inflation that is eroding Americans' purchasing power, dimming their confidence in the economy and threatening Democrats in Congress in the run-up to the November midterm elections. On a month-to-month basis, prices rose 1% from May to June, faster than the 0.6% rise from April to May and the biggest such jump since 2005. "Consumer sentiment sure stinks but Americans nevertheless continue to increase their spending," Bill Adams, chief economist for Comerica Bank, said in response to the inflation figures released this morning.A separate...