OKC Zoo caretakers explain how they’re helping in giraffe conservation effort

The Oklahoma City Zoo takes part in World Giraffe Day each year as part of a world preservation effort to secure the species.Experts approximate the giraffe population has actually reduced 30% given that the 1980s.”A lot of our animals, they are so important to our ecosystem,” senior animal caretaker Lisbeth Pisias said.The day is intended on the longest day of the year to represent the animal’s long and high necks.”World Giraffe Day is to bring attention to the fact that these guys are going through what we’re calling a silent extinction,” Pisias said.Depending on the types, giraffes in the wild are either threatened or seriously threatened. That’s why the Oklahoma City Zoo takes part in a program called the Types Survival Strategy.”This is us breeding animals based off genetics, so we are here to conserve and preserve the species,” Pisias stated. Simply a couple of weeks back, the zoo’s 20-year-old giraffe, Ellie, had her 8th calf. And now, they’re waiting on Julu to have her first.The zoo worked with a preservation company in Africa a couple of years ago to get more information about the animal’s habits.”The zoo actually sent me to that area to work with the Giraffe Conservation Foundation,” Pisias stated. “Seeing kind of how they eat, how they rest, what they’re doing. We come back and then try to recreate that even more for them.”That’s why the giraffe caretakers feed them trees, to provide the natural diet plan they would get in the wild.

The Oklahoma City Zoo takes part in World Giraffe Day each year as part of a world preservation effort to secure the types.

Professionals approximate the giraffe population has actually reduced 30% given that the 1980s.

“A lot of our animals, they are so important to our ecosystem,” senior animal caretaker Lisbeth Pisias stated.

The day is intended on the longest day of the year to represent the animal’s long and high necks.

“World Giraffe Day is to bring attention to the fact that these guys are going through what we’re calling a silent extinction,” Pisias stated.

Depending upon the types, giraffes in the wild are either threatened or seriously threatened. That’s why the Oklahoma City Zoo takes part in a program called the Types Survival Strategy.

“This is us breeding animals based off genetics, so we are here to conserve and preserve the species,” Pisias stated.

Simply a couple of weeks back, the zoo’s 20-year-old giraffe, Ellie, had her 8th calf. And now, they’re waiting on Julu to have her very first.

The zoo worked with a preservation company in Africa a couple of years ago to get more information about the animal’s habits.

“The zoo actually sent me to that area to work with the Giraffe Conservation Foundation,” Pisias stated. “Seeing kind of how they eat, how they rest, what they’re doing. We come back and then try to recreate that even more for them.”

That’s why the giraffe caretakers feed them trees, to provide the natural diet plan they would get in the wild.

Jobber Wiki author Frank Long contributed to this report.