Multi-day cleanup expected following derailment near Carlisle

Lots of specially-trained employees and a variety of heavy equipment got here early Saturday early morning to start clearing a train derailment simply east of Carlisle. Authorities approximate about 20 railcars from the middle area of the train hindered, and a few of them were introduced down the hillside beside Highway 5.Nobody was injured in the mishap Friday night, and professionals have actually validated no dangerous products were launched in the crash. The main contents that spilled were lumber and dry items such as salt. “We treated it like there was injuries,” stated Hartford Fire Chief Zack Prickett. “We treated it like there was a big hazmat spill–everything. We put all the resources we train with in motion to make sure we had those resources available if there was any of that when we got here.”Luckily, that was not required. However there will be a substantial clean-up in the coming days to both get rid of the railcars and their contents and eventually restore that part of the track. “It’s organized chaos, actually,” said Troy Bass, who leads Warren County’s Emergency Management Agency. “To a person going down the road it looks like they’re digging and pushing stuff around, but it’s all systematic.”Union Pacific, whose train was involved, sent a specialized team to handle the repairs. Local officials say they expect the track to reopen early next week. It is too early to determine what caused the derailment.

Dozens of specially-trained workers and an array of heavy machinery arrived early Saturday morning to begin clearing a train derailment just east of Carlisle.

Officials estimate about 20 railcars from the middle section of the train derailed, and some of them were launched down the hillside next to Highway 5.

No one was hurt in the accident Friday night, and experts have confirmed no hazardous materials were released in the crash.

The primary contents that spilled were lumber and dry goods such as salt.

“We treated it like there was injuries,” said Hartford Fire Chief Zack Prickett. “We treated it like there was a big hazmat spill–everything. We put all the resources we train with in motion to make sure we had those resources available if there was any of that when we got here.”

Fortunately, that was not needed. But there will be a substantial clean-up in the coming days to both get rid of the railcars and their contents and eventually restore that part of the track.

“It’s organized chaos, actually,” stated Troy Bass, who leads Warren County’s Emergency situation Management Company. “To a person going down the road it looks like they’re digging and pushing stuff around, but it’s all systematic.”

Union Pacific, whose train was included, sent out a specialized group to manage the repair work. Regional authorities state they anticipate the track to resume early next week.

It is prematurely to identify what triggered the derailment.

Jobber Wiki author Frank Long contributed to this report.