JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure: Stone Ocean review: Part 1 rules

In deep space of JoJo’s Unusual Experience, the well-known anime adjustment of Hirohiko Araki’s long-running supernatural action experience manga series, the Joestar household are the undeniable heroes. A household of superhumanly talented martial artists, benefactors, mafia dons, and marine biologists covering over six-plus generations, the Joestars are framed as an unambiguous cumulative force for excellent — fighting serial killers, megalomaniacal vampires, and all sorts of fiendish enemies as they try to correct their particular corners of the world.

However the Joestar clan is not exempt from anime’s long cumulative history of bad dads. Comparable to the similarity Dragon Ball’s Goku, Hunter x Hunter’s Ging Freecss, or Fullmetal Alchemist’s Van Hohenheim, the Joestars boast their own reasonable share of absentee or irresponsible dads, with no less than 5 members of the Joestar extended household having actually been either sired out of reckless cheating or through the complicated machinations of DIO, the household’s long time bane.

Jolyne Cujoh and Jotaro Kujo in JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure: Stone Ocean.

Image: David Production/Netflix

However in the preliminary 12 episodes of Stone Ocean, the 5th season of the JoJo’s Unusual Experience anime series which premiered on Netflix previously today, the effect of a stretched relationship in between missing dad and kid is a driving force. When Jotaro Kujo is initially seen in the 2nd season of the anime, Stardust Crusaders, he’s presented as a foul-mouthed ne’er succeed in a leather coat vulnerable to entering battles and cursing out his mom. In Stone Ocean, his child, Jolyne Cujoh, is not that much various than how Jotaro was around her age: a distressed teen with a history of theft and joyriding whose overdue habits is just additional worsened by her dad’s lack.

When Jolyne initially fulfills her dad quickly after being jailed at Green Dolphin Street Jail, her instant response is disgust; assaulting a guard at the danger of holding cell instead of even speaking with him. Though it’s indicated that Jotaro’s lack in Jolyne’s life remained in part encouraged by a desire to safeguard her, it’s not an excellent appearance thinking about Jotaro himself matured without his own dad present throughout the majority of his life. And in the lack of any explanation while she was growing up, Jolyne can’t help but appearance at her dad with contempt, while Jotaro can’t assist however come across as emotionally cold and distant. In spite of all the growth Jotaro has undergone in the 22 years since the events of Stardust Crusaders and Stone Ocean, he’s still earned the title of bad dad. But while Josuke Higashikata, the protagonist of Diamond is Unbreakable, more or less let his elderly dad Joseph Joestar off the hook in exchange for never contacting his mother Tomoko again, Stone Ocean forces Jotaro and his daughter to work together in order to survive and confront the assorted emotional baggage brought about through Jotaro’s neglect as a parent. It’s a fascinating encounter that puts into stark relief how persistently poor parenting and a habit for keeping secrets runs throughout the Joestar family and how consistently it comes back to undermine their best intentions.

Jolyne Cujoh and Jotaro Kujo in JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure: Stone Ocean.

Image: David Production/Netflix

Despite her animosity for him, Jolyne has to work together with her father when the pair are ambushed by Johngalli A, a former disciple of DIO who orchestrated Jolyne’s imprisonment in order to draw out Jotaro. And though she’s steely during their attempted escape, Jolyne clearly yearns for Jotaro’s affection and approval. It’s here their combat abilities form a bridge neither could with words: Jotaro is wounded and caught off-guard by a second assailant, Palesnake, while moving to Jolyne from an attack by Johngalli. Using her Stand abilities, Jolyne is able to defeat Johngalli and by all appearances save her father’s life, though she’s unable to stop Palesnake from achieving his real objective of stealing Jotaro’s soul and Stand ability. Faced with the opportunity to escape to freedom on her own, Jolyne instead chooses to stay behind at the prison and face the consequences of her attempted jailbreak in order to find a way to restore Jotaro’s soul and consciousness back to his body. It’s a dramatic turning point for the series to confront the bad blood between two Joestar family members, with Jolyne not so much forgiving Jotaro, however nonetheless acknowledging that nothing can be made right between the two of them if she abandons him to his death. In spite of his faults, Jotaro does care about and love Jolyne in his own way, and Jolyne reciprocates that love by resolving to make him whole again.

Stone Ocean doesn’t shy away from showing what the potential of a more healthy relationship with her papa lets Jolyne do. She quickly grows accustomed to her newfound powers as a Stand User, becoming more confident and calm under pressure while attempting to track down the true identity of Palesnake and save her father. Spurred by her goal of reconciling with her father, Jolyne grows into a heroic and resilient lead character not unlike her relatives in the Joestar Family line. If Jolyne is able to save her dad’s soul and return it to his body, there may yet be hope for her and Jotaro to formally reconcile and embody a healthier example for the Joestar household going forward. At the very least, it might afford them the chance to actually seek out family therapy — something that honestly the entire Joestar clan might most likely take advantage of.

Jojo’s Unusual Experience: Stone Ocean is readily available to stream on Netflix.

Jobber Wiki author Frank Long contributed to this report.