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5 Things To Know Before Buying The Nintendo Switch Port


Being a game about a full expansive universe where players can explore a never-ending world that is different for every player. No Man’s Sky had a lot going for it, because the planets that were in the game allowed players to explore each and every one. However, what was delivered was a different experience, like multiplayer was missing, and many game-breaking bugs. Along with a lot of planets were barren, and had nothing to do, making a large amount of these planets to be filler.


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Not all was bad though, since 2016, No Man’s Sky has been going through so many changes, with each update expanding the game, and making it better. Since then, No Man’s Sky is a much different game than it was. Now, owners of the Nintendo Switchcan enjoy this immersive sci-fi exploration game. While the Switch version of No Man Sky is a lot like the other versions on the other platforms, there are some things that separate the port from the others. This list will showcase those differences and in turn, make their purchasers more informed.

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5/5 The Size

Since No Man Sky has no cloud version, the game will take up space on the player’s Switch. The game is about 3 gigabytes, which is rather big for the console since the Switch has a small onboard memory. This makes sense because No Man Sky is a huge game, and since it features an expansive universe with so much to do, players will need a good amount of space. While this may seem like an issue, the plus side is that players can take it on the go.

This can make traveling go by even quicker because players will get lost in this world, and it’s all on their Switch. To combat this situation, thankfully, the Switch has removable memory, which can go up to 2 terabytes; this can help in many ways. Not only will players have more space, but No Man Sky will load faster and play more efficiently when playing with more space.

4/5 Custom Difficulty

This is new to the Switch version of No Man’s Sky; players can create their own experiences that are unique to them and in turn, make the game one-of-a-kind. They can play on a more relaxed difficulty, which encourages players to explore, all without the added stress of the survival aspect of No Man Sky. However, if players want a more extreme experience, which adds to the immersion, they can do just that. Rather than having easy, medium, or hard, No Man Sky gives players a more tailored experience, and that’s through the many things they can change in the difficulty.

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As mentioned before, when they do this, No Man Sky becomes different for all players, which makes the game fun to play, since players can express their own gameplay. If players opt to play in the relaxed setting, they can get a lot more out of No Man’s Sky because they can do more. Players would have turned away, because there is so much going on, playing No Man’s Sky this way allows them to play without that stress.

3/5 No Cloud Version

As mentioned before, No Man Sky has no cloud version, meaning players don’t need to be online at all to play the game. Many big games on the Switch have been put on the cloud in order to run on the console; however, No Man Sky is fully optimized for the Switch, which makes things better. Now, they can take this super immersive world with them on the go and don’t need good internet, which makes gameplay better.

Because if players explore, the last thing they need is the internet to shut off, which can make players turn away from the game. Since No Man Sky is playing right off the console, this makes the experience better. Being able to translate a massive world that changes every time the players load, it seems like the cloud version would work, but being able to stuff this huge game in a cartridge is great news for all players.

2/5 Taking It On The Go

As mentioned before, No Man Sky is not on the cloud, allowing players to take their console with them on the go. This makes it one of the best games to play on the Switch because players can get lost in all these worlds while they’re traveling. In turn, they can take some great pictures while they explore, and while they’re traveling to work or school, players can get lost in the universe. Since it’s such a massive game, playing No Man Sky is just as great as playing on the go as it is at home.

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They can explore all the planets, or however many they can, which will make them want to take this game with them. Because players can do something big at home and take the adventure with them to continue it, and that makes the progress in No Man Sky more manageable. The best part is that while most other bigger games that are ported over on the Switch don’t perform as well when the console isn’t docked, that is not the case for No Man Sky. So players won’t see a downgrade in performance when they travel.

1/5 No Multiplayer

One of the biggest and best aspects of No Man Sky is playing with friends. Since the other versions of the game allow players to do that, it gives No Man Sky the community engagement that’s what the game was initially based on. However, for the Switch port, there’s no multiplayer, at least for now. This means players will be traversing through the universes alone for the time being. There are pros and cons to not having multiplayer, a pro is that this game can be taken on the go, making travel more fun.

A con is that players won’t be able to build, create, and explore with their friends. But, if players remember, No Man Sky promised multiplayer at launch back in 2016, only to show up 2 years later. This may be the case for the Switch port because while at launch, it didn’t appear, players can expect it to come in the future. This will help expand the game and the experience.

No Man Sky is available now on Xbox Series X/S, Xbox One, PS5, PS4, Nintendo Switch, Mobile, and PC.

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